Annual conferences

The P&A Centre holds a conference each year to encourage women in a variety of ministries and think more seriously and creatively about how men and women can work better together in ministry.

The Complementarian Jigsaw: Gender, Ministry, and the Local Church

2019 Conference details

Main speaker: Graham Beynon

  • Monday 4 February, 2019
  • 9am-5pm (coffee from 8:30am)
  • Moore College,
    1 King St
    Newtown 2042

This conference is aimed primarily at women and men in vocational ministry, but others are most welcome. It has a two-fold aim:

  1. encourage women in a variety of ministries and
  2. help us all think more seriously and creatively about how women and men can work better in ministry.

It focuses on the application end of complementarianism.

About our 2019 morning speakers
Graham Beynon

Graham will give two talks on “The Complementarian jigsaw: Gender,...

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Graham Beynon

Graham will give two talks on “The Complementarian jigsaw: Gender, ministry and the local church”: How do men and women complement each other? Is their ministry different or done differently? And what difference does the setting of the local church make for ministry together? We will consider a positive vision of ministry for both genders, and rather than focusing on the role of women in isolation, we will consider how our ecclesiology shapes ministry and relationships for everyone.

About Graham

Graham Beynon believes in the local church and in theological training for the sake of the local church. He tries to fulfill these convictions by being senior pastor of Grace Church (FIEC and Acts 29) in Cambridge, and Director of Independent Ministry Training at Oak Hill College in North London.

Graham believes we need church leaders and workers who are biblically grounded, theologically astute, historically aware and pastorally focused. He teaches in a variety of areas at Oak Hill including leadership, church polity, church history and corporate worship.

His PhD was from St Andrews University, examining the theology of Isaac Watts. He is the author of a number of books, including Money Counts (2016, The Good Book Co.), Isaac Watts: His Life and Thought (2013, Christian Focus), Emotions: Living Life in Colour (2012, IVP), Planting for the Gospel: A Hands on Guide to Church Planting (2011, Christian Focus), Mirror, Mirror: Discover Your True Identity in Christ (2008, IVP), and God's New Community: New Testament Patterns for Today's Church (2005, IVP).

Graham was previously an audiological scientist working with hearing and balance disorders. He then moved to pastoring churches in Leicester and Cambridge. He has particularly been involved in leading church plants. He is married to Charis and they have three children. In his spare time, he enjoys watching TV with Charis, walking with their dog, trying his hand at DIY, watching sport and playing five-a-side football.

Jane Tooher

What Jane will be speaking on will be advertised at...

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Jane Tooher

What Jane will be speaking on will be advertised at a later date.

Jane has served on the faculty of Moore Theological College since August 2009. She lectures in Ministry, Church History and New Testament, and is the Director of the Priscilla & Aquila Centre. Before joining the faculty, she served in parish ministry in Sydney and London. She lives in Newtown with two of her nephews. In 2018, she will be taking some study leave to write a book aimed at women on the doctrine of humanity. Jane enjoys movies, walking, and spending time with family and friends.

Elective Information for 2019

Electives A (before afternoon tea)

1. The Trinity and gender: Keeping God at a safe distance

David Höhne

David Höhne

In recent times, the relationship between the doctrine of the Trinity and our understanding of gender in ministry or the home has come under intense scrutiny. A significant divide has emerged between conservative evangelicals around the world as to how, or even whether, the doctrine of the Trinity should be used in describing church relationships between men and women.

This seminar will examine the uses and abuses of the doctrine of the Trinity in recent decades with special reference to its employment in gender debates. We will consider the circumstances that led to its clarification in the fourth and fifth centuries, before laying out some guidelines for the difficult but necessary task of establishing a theological anthropology based on what God has revealed of himself as Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Level: Popular academic

David Höhne

David is on the faculty of Moore Theological College, teaching theology, philosophy and church history.

He is currently researching a book on the coming Kingdom of God as the fulfilment of God’s promises to save through the Lord Jesus.

With Amelia and their children Anna, Joshua and Samuel, David rejoices in the opportunities to serve our heavenly Father in the college community.

2. Partnering in life and ministry

Ed and Jocelyn Loane

Ed and Jocelyn Loane

There are numerous challenges for married couples and families in ministry. Partnership can look different in a variety of contexts and seasons yet biblical principles can help us navigate the challenges and joys of seeking to serve God together. Ed and Joc Loane have partnered together in a variety of ministry contexts in Australia and overseas as well as in parenting their five children. In this seminar they share some of their personal experiences as well as biblical reflections on partnering together in life and ministry.

Level: Popular

Ed & Jocelyn Loane

Ed and Joc Loane have partnered together in a variety of ministry contexts in Australia and overseas as well as in parenting their five children. Ed serves on the faculty of Moore where he lectures in church history and theology. Joc is a stay at home mum and is involved in a number of ministries in her local church and in the Moore College community.

3. Men and women: Being co-workers in Christ: What it looks like on the ground

Kara Hartley

Kara Hartley

Amy Stopher

Amy Stopher

Men and women have been co-workers in the local church since the New Testament. How can we continue to build robust, positive and thoughtful ministry teams of men and women who are committed to gospel proclamation?

Join Amy Stopher and Kara Hartley as they explore the opportunities and benefits for the local church and the broader community when men and women serve together.

Level: Popular

Kara Hartley

Kara is the Archdeacon for Women’s Ministry in the Sydney Diocese. She is involved with teaching the Bible to women at events, conferences and retreats; meeting with and supporting women in ministry; and recruiting and training women for ministry.

Kara is married to Brett, and they live in the southern suburbs of Sydney. She attends St John’s Sutherland.

Amy Stopher

Amy grew up in the sun-washed northern suburbs of Perth, and first learned the gospel from her parents. She is an Associate Pastor at Providence Church in the inner suburbs of Perth, pastoring women, and equipping and encouraging the congregation to serve the Lord and his people. Amy taught high school students politics and English before studying theology, and still loves the Saturday papers.

4. How to think theologically about anything (including complementarianism)

Tony Payne

Tony Payne

One of the striking features of the complementarian debate over the past 30 years has been not just the different viewpoints that have been expressed, but the different methods of argument that have emerged, particularly among those who regard the Bible as authoritative for today. It’s not just that evangelicals have reached differing exegetical conclusions about the text; we have also often adopted quite different ways of applying the text to what we should do today.

This has exposed a weakness. We tend to be more confident in arguing about the text itself than in providing a coherent theological rationale for how the text applies to us today.

In this seminar, we will assess some of the most common ways people use the Bible and theology in relation to ministry issues, and sketch out a better way forward.

Level: Popular academic

Tony Payne

Tony Payne is a well-known author and publisher with Matthias Media, and is currently working to complete a PhD at Moore College in theological ethics. He is also the Director of the Centre for Christian Living at Moore College.

5. The Spiritual Care Course: Caring for older Australians

Robin Kinstead

Robin Kinstead

Sarah Kinstead

Sarah Kinstead

Follow the links below to learn more about the Spiritual Care Course:

Level: Popular

Robin Kinstead

Robin Kinstead is a follower of Jesus, an Anglican pastor to the saints at Christ Church on Sydney’s Northern Beaches, a husband to Sarah and the father of two children.

Formerly a head-hunter for lawyers, he is certified in science, theology, supervision and self-defence. He enjoys gathering with others and grappling with God’s word so that they are equipped to fight the good fight for the Christian faith.

Robin believes God’s purpose for his life is to pursue meekness among men. He loves music, movies, mountains and mnemonics! He hopes to create and share a vision for using martial models and methods in ministry.

Sarah Kinstead

Sarah lives on the Northern beaches of Sydney with her husband Robin and their two children. In her capacity as an acting Level II Pastoral Supervisor, Sarah trains up lay pastoral visitors and has worked with clergy across the region to form the Northern Beaches Christian Chaplaincy as a church-wide response to the Northern Beaches Hospital opening in October 2018. Sarah also lectures at Mary Andrews College in Pastoral Evangelism, a course that she wrote as a holistic approach to sharing the gospel with others.

Electives B: After afternoon tea

1. Women in early church history

Tara Stenhouse

Tara Stenhouse

Elective description TBA.

Level: Popular academic

Tara Stenhouse

Originally from beautiful Wollongong, Tara has spent most of the last 20 years at the University of New South Wales, with nine of those years as women’s pastor with Unichurch and Campus Bible Study. Tara oversees the pastoral care of the women students at Moore College (along with 12 part-time women chaplains), including the community of women living in Carillon House. She teaches in the Ministry Department and enjoys discussing how we serve together as women and men.

Tara is married to Ian and they love relaxing at Callala Bay on the south coast.

Tara is involved in producing the Equal But Different journal, and is an itinerant speaker at women’s events and conferences. She also taught a small group leadership course called “Room for Improvement”.

2. Teaching children biblical and theological truths through catechism

Peter and Christine Jensen

Peter and Christian Jensen

The Scriptures put a high priority on teaching children the faith, so this is part of our culture as we share our knowledge of God in families, Sunday Schools and Scripture lessons. We can always improve the way we go about this.

Peter and Christine Jensen are both parents and teachers. They have given considerable thought to how best to teach children and, in particular, the place of catechism in such education. Listen to them talk about their experience, and raise issues and ask questions to enrich the seminar.

Level: Popular

Peter and Christine Jensen

Peter and Christine are members of St Matthias Anglican, Centennial Park. They have 5 adult child and enjoy spending time with their grandchildren. They have been involved in a variety of ministries over many decades. Peter previously served as Principal of Moore College and then as Archbishop of Sydney. He recently retired as Secretary of GAFCON. Christine does itinerant speaking for Christian women’s groups, is involved in Mother’s Union,  and serves in ministry at St Matthias. She is very interested in children’s books.

3. Moving singles from the margins to the middle

Dani Treweek

Dani Treweek

Almost one out of every three adults in our Australian evangelical churches are not married. Yet those same people can all too easily be considered a peripheral “special needs” group within many of our congregations. How has it come to be that men and women who have never married, or are divorced or widowed are too often treated, or consider themselves to be, marginal members of our church families? How can we better equip ourselves to recognise and celebrate the single person’s authentic place of belonging within the body of Christ? In this elective, we’ll engage in some critical thinking about a range of ideals and norms that, being deeply embedded within our Christian culture, tend to inform some of our problematic thinking on this count. How might we challenge, correct and reform unhelpful pastoral assumptions and attitudes towards singleness within the Christian life and community?

Level: Popular academic

Dani Treweek

After training at Moore Theological College, Dani served as the women’s ministry trainer and assistant minister at St Matthias Anglican Church, Centennial Park, for almost seven years. At the beginning of 2016, she embarked on doctoral research into a theological ethic of singleness, with the aim of developing resources to further equip churches in their evangelism, pastoral care and teaching of those who are unmarried. Dani lives in Sydney’s inner west. She’s a single woman of a certain age who enjoys thwarting the stereotype through her dislike of cats.

4. Being a married woman on a staff team

Joan Young

Joan Young

Stephanie Judd

Stephanie Judd

Marriage and ministry are both wonderful gifts from God. Being a married woman in ministry provides unique opportunities to honour and serve Jesus as well as presenting unique challenges.  In this elective Joan and Stephanie will share their own personal experiences of responding to these opportunities and challenges. They will provide some practical wisdom on how to do both marriage and ministry well as a married woman as well as how to support and enable a married woman in ministry. This will be followed by a time of Q&A.

Level: Popular

Joan Young

Joan has served in various church, para-church and college-based ministries during the last 35+ years. She lives with her husband Warwick in a high-rise multicultural suburb of Sydney’s Inner West. They enjoy belonging to a local church St James Croydon where, until recently, as a member of the staff team, Joan led the growth groups and women’s ministry. She speaks at conferences and facilitates workshops, where she shares the gospel. Currently she is one of the chaplains at Moore. When she isn’t meeting one-to-one, mentoring others, or prompting neighbours to think in light of eternity, she spends time reading, preparing for her next conference talk or workshop, sipping coffee, or escaping to the great outdoors.

Stephanie Judd

Stephanie Judd is Women’s Ministry Director at City on a Hill, Melbourne and Associate Minister in the Lead Pastor’s Office. In addition to her roles at City on a Hill Stephanie also teaches at various conferences and events. She is passionate about excellent teaching and preaching of the Word, and loves to help people see, understand, and feel their gospel reality with clarity, conviction, and joy. She is married to Andrew and together they have a son called Joshua who is an active, driven and dramatic one year old.

Future conferences

Monday, 3 February, 2020. Main speaker: Nick Tucker.

Monday, 1 February, 2021. Main speaker: Gary Millar, with Fiona Millar.

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